Marvel Champions FFG RRG changelog

You can find rulings and FAQ changes here

1.0 Release (August 1, 2019)


Changed from 1.0 -> 1.1 (November 1, 2019)

Move

• If damage is moved to a character, the moved damage is considered to be dealt to that character.

• If threat is moved to a scheme, the moved threat is considered to be placed to that scheme

Star Icon

A star icon is used in conjunction with a card’s stat or boost field to indicate that
there is a mandatory ability in the text box that corresponds to that field. In and
of itself, the star icon has no effect; it is merely a reminder to check the card’s
text box whenever that field is used.

• If a star icon is located next to an enemy’s ATK or SCH value, the icon serves as a reminder to check that enemy’s text box whenever that enemy uses that
value to attack or scheme. For example: Tiger Shark has an ATK value of 3, with a star
icon in the field. Whenever Tiger Shark attacks, this icon reminds the players to check his text box. In the text box, they find the mandatory Forced Response, which reads,
“After Tiger Shark attacks, give him a tough status card.” Because this star is associated with Tiger Shark’s attack power, only the ability that references his attack power
is used. The Boost ability, which does not reference this power, is ignored.

• If a star icon is located in the ATK or SCH field of an attachment, the icon serves as a reminder to check that attachment’s text box whenever the attached
enemy uses the value that field is modifying to attack or scheme.

• If a star icon is located next to an ally’s ATK or THW value, the icon serves as a reminder to check that ally’s text box whenever that ally uses that value to
attack or thwart.

• If a star icon is located next to a hero’s ATK, THW, or DEF, or next to an alter-ego’s REC value, the icon serves as a reminder to check that character’s text box whenever they use that value to attack, thwart, defend, or recover.

• If a star icon is located in an encounter card’s boost field, the icon serves as a reminder to check that card’s text box whenever that card is turned face up
as a boost card during the villain’s activation. For example: The villain has activated, and the players are resolving boost cards. The Tiger Shark card is turned
faceup and has a star icon in its boost field. Whenever this card is flipped as a boost card, this icon reminds the players to check the its text box. In the text box, they find
the mandatory Boost ability, which reads, “Give the villain a tough status card.” Because this star is located in the boost field, only the Boost ability is used. The star next
to the Forced Response, which references Tiger Shark’s attack power, is ignored.

You

In Marvel Champions, each player takes on the role of a Marvel Hero, represented by the identity card. Essentially, the player is their identity card while playing the game.

• While interpreting card text, if the word “you” can be interpreted as referring to the player, it should be interpreted as such. For example, Interrogation Room
reads, “After you defeat a minion, exhaust Interrogation Room…” Any time the player controlling this card defeats a minion, the ability may be used.

• If a specific character is required to interpret an ability using the word “you,” the identity card is the character that must be used. For example, Toe to Toe reads,
“Hero Action (attack): Choose an enemy. That enemy attacks you.” As attacks are directed against individual characters, “you” refers to the identity card of the of the player who played this event


Changed from 1.1 -> 1.2 (February 25, 2020)

Ability, Card ability

Card abilities cannot resolve during game setup, unless prefaced by a “Setup” timing trigger.

The resolution of the following ability types is mandatory: constant abilities, “Setup” abilities, “When Revealed” abilities, “When Defeated” abilities, “Forced Interrupt” abilities, “Forced Response” abilities, “Boost” abilities, and keywords. If one of these ability types uses the word “may”, the part of the ability following “may” is optional.

Component Limitations

There is no limit to the number of threat tokens, damage tokens, acceleration tokens, status cards, or all-purpose counters that can be in the game at a given time. If players run out of the provided tokens, counters, or status cards, other tokens, counters, or coins may be used.

Dash

If a game step or ability references a power with the value of dash (–), that value is treated as 0

Defend, Defense

When an enemy makes an attack, the players have the option to defend against the attack. There are a few different ways this can occur:

  • If no hero or ally is used to defend the attack, then the attack is considered undefended.
  • If a triggered ability is labeled as a defense—such as “Hero Action (defense)”—that ability can only be resolved by a player while they are the target of an attack. For example, Shield Block reads: “Interrupt (defense): When you would take any amount of damage, exhaust Captain America’s Shield to prevent all of that damage.” Because Shield Block is a defense card, it can only be played while the Captain America player is the target of an attack.

Enemy Attacks

If a villain is attacking, flip each of the villain’s boost cards faceup one at a time. (If a minion is attacking, skip this step.) Then, in order:

• Resolve any “Boost” abilities, indicated by the star icon in the boost field.

• Increase the villain’s ATK value by one for each boost icon on the card.

• Discard each boost card after it is resolved.

Enemy Schemes

If a villain is scheming, flip each of the villain’s boost cards faceup one at a time. (If a minion is scheming, skip this step.) Then, in order:

Resolve any “Boost” abilities, indicated by the star icon in the boost field.

• Increase the villain’s SCH value by one for each boost icon on the card.

• Discard each boost card after it is resolved.

Indirect Damage

This is assessed without accounting for interactions with other abilities. For example, if you take 5 indirect damage, but you control an ally in play with 4 hit points remaining, you may assign 4 of that indirect damage to the ally, then assign the remaining 1 indirect damage to your identity

Remaining Hit Points

An identity or villain’s remaining hit points are the value on the dial

Star Icon

If a game step or ability references a power with the value of star (), that value is treated as 0.


Changed from 1.2 -> 1.3 (March 23, 2020)

Additional

The word “additional” denotes a modifier to an ability or game state. The additional modifier is resolved simultaneously with any ability it is modifying and under the same conditions as that ability

Ally Limit

If a player ever controls a number of allies greater than their ally limit in play, they must immediately choose and discard from play ally cards they control until they have a number of allies in play equal to their ally limit.

Modes of Play

Before starting a game of Marvel Champions, players can customize their experience by choosing from different modes of play. The modes of play are:

Standard Mode — Standard Mode is the basic mode of play for all scenarios. To play in Standard Mode, follow the normal content and setup instructions for the chosen
scenario.

Expert Mode — Expert Mode is for advanced players who seek a greater challenge. To play in Expert Mode, follow the content and setup instructions for the chosen scenario,
using the listed expert mode villain stages, and add the Expert encounter set to encounter deck.

Rookie Mode — Rookie Mode allows players to enjoy a more forgiving experience. Rookie Mode follows the Standard Mode rules with one exception: when the first stage of the villain is defeated, the players win the game.

Heroic Mode — Heroic Mode allows players to customize their challenge through scaling difficulty. Heroic Mode follows the Expert Mode rules with one exception: before
starting a game in Heroic Mode, the player group chooses a heroic level number, such as heroic level 1 or 4. Then, for the remainder of that game, during step three of each villain
phase, deal X additional encounter cards to each player, where X is equal to the chosen heroic level number.

For instance, if players choose heroic level 1, each player will
be dealt a minimum of 2 encounter cards during each villain phase (1 from the normal villain phase step and 1 from the heroic level); if players choose heroic level 4, each player will be dealt a minimum of 5 encounter cards during each villain phase.


Changed from 1.3 -> 1.4 (April 21, 2021)

Ability

An ability is game text on a card that explains what the card does (or can do). Several examples can be seen in Appendix III of this Rules Reference.

When an ability has more than one sentence of text, read the entirety of the ability to check for alteration effects that may change the way the ability resolves. Then, resolve the ability one sentence at a time

Constant Abilities — A constant ability is any non-keyword
ability whose text contains no bold timing trigger defining
its ability type. A constant ability becomes active as soon as
its card enters play and remains active while the card is in
play.
• Some constant abilities continuously seek a specific
condition (denoted by words such as “during”, “if”,
or “while”). The effects of such abilities are active
anytime the specific condition is met.
• If multiple instances of the same constant ability
are in play, each instance affects the game
independently.
Triggered Abilities — A triggered ability is indicated by a
bold timing trigger followed by a colon and the rest of the
ability text.
• A triggered ability on a player card can only be
initiated if its effect could change the game on its
own. This potential is assessed without taking into
account the consequences of the cost payment or
future responses to the effect.
• Unless prefaced by the word “Forced”, all interrupt
and response abilities are optional.
• “Forced” abilities, “When Revealed” abilities,
“When Defeated” abilities, and “When Completed”
abilities are triggered by the game at the ability’s
appropriate timing point.
• If the bold timing trigger of an ability contains the
word “Hero” or “Alter-Ego,” the ability can only
be used if the player triggering the ability is in the
specified form.
• If quotation marks are used around a timing trigger
and colon, the quoted text is not itself a timing
trigger, but is instead referring to other abilities with
that trigger.
Some abilities have timing priority over other abilities. In
order, the timing priority of abilities is:

  1. Constant abilities.
  2. “Forced Interrupt” abilities.
  3. “Interrupt” abilities.
    4.“Forced Response” abilities.
  4. “Response” abilities.
    See also: Action, Alteration Effect, “And”, Cancel, Delayed
    Effect, Forced, In Play and Out of Play, Initiating Abilities,
    Interrupt, Lasting Effects, Qualifiers, Replacement Effects,
    Resource Ability, Response, Simultaneous Resolution,
    Special, Then, When Defeated Abilities, When Revealed
    Abilities

Acceleration Icon

An acceleration icon represents additional forces that are
advancing the villain’s nefarious plans.
During step one of the villain phase, place X additional
threat on the main scheme, where X is the number of
acceleration icons in play.
• An acceleration icon can be removed from play by
defeating the encounter card it is printed on.
See also: Icons, Main Scheme, Threat, Villain Phase
ACCELERATION TOKEN
Acceleration tokens are functionally
equivalent to acceleration icons. They are
placed next to the main scheme as a reminder
to add X additional threat to the main scheme
during step one of the villain phase, where X
is the number of acceleration tokens in play.
Acceleration tokens enter play through one of two effects:
• If the encounter deck is empty, place one acceleration
token next to the main scheme.
• Card effects may instruct the players to add an
acceleration token to play.
Acceleration tokens cannot be removed from play. Unlike
other tokens, when a main scheme card leaves play, the
acceleration token does not get discarded.

Activation

There are two types of enemy activations: an attack
activation and a scheme activation. Whenever an enemy
attacks or schemes, it is considered to have activated.

• During step two of the villain phase, the villain
activates once per player, in player order. If the
identity of the player resolving the activation is in
hero form, the villain initiates an attack against that
player’s identity
. If the identity of the player resolving
the activation is in alter-ego form, the villain initiates
a scheme.
During step two of the villain phase, each minion
engaged with a player activates against that player.
If the identity of the engaged player is in hero form,
the minion initiates an attack against that player’s
identity. If the identity of the engaged player is in
alter-ego form, the minion initiates a scheme.

• Each time the villain activates, give the villain
one boost card from the encounter deck for that
activation.
• Some card abilities can also cause enemies to attack
or scheme. These are also considered activations.
If multiple enemies activate against you simultaneously,
resolve the villain’s activation first (if any) in the order of
your choice, followed by minion activations in the order
of your choice.

If an activating minion leaves play, that minion’s
activation ends immediately and no further steps of
that activation resolve.

Ally

Ally is a player card type that represents an identity’s
friends, supporters, or companions.
• If an ally enters play, it remains in play until a card
ability or game effect causes it to leave play. If an
ally’s remaining hit points are reduced to zero, it is
defeated and discarded from play.
• During a player’s turn, they may use any number of
allies they control to attack or thwart. An ally must
exhaust to attack or thwart.
• After an ally is used to attack or thwart, deal
consequential damage to that ally equal to the
number of consequential damage icons ()
beneath
the ally’s ATK or THW field. (If an ally attempts
to attack or thwart while stunned or confused,
respectively, that ally will not take consequential
damage.)

• If a player is attacked, any player may exhaust an ally
they control to defend against the attack. If an ally
defends against an attack, all damage from the attack
is dealt to the ally.
Attacks, thwarts, defenses, action abilities, and
triggered abilities that resolve from allies in play
under a player’s control are not considered to be
performed by that player’s identity.

Ally Limit

A player may play or put into play allies beyond their ally limit. However, if a player ever controls a number of allies greater than their ally limit in play, they must immediately choose and discard from play ally cards they control until they have a number of allies in play equal to their ally limit. This occurs before abilities that resolve upon entering play.

Alteration Effect

An alteration effect modifies the resolution of an ability that
precedes it. The types of alteration effects are “additional,”
“already,” and “each time” effects.
Additional — The word “additional” denotes a modifier to
an ability or game state. The additional modifier is resolved
simultaneously with any ability it is modifying and under the
same conditions as that ability. (For example, Repulsor Blast
reads: “Hero Action (attack): Deal 1 damage to an enemy
and discard the top 5 cards of your deck. For each printed
 resource discarded this way, deal 2 additional damage to
that enemy.”)
Already — The word “already” denotes the resolution of an
alternate ability if a specific condition is met. The “already”
effect checks if this condition is met before the preceding
ability attempts to resolve. If so, the “already” effect
resolves instead. (For example, I’m Tough reads: “When
Revealed: Give Rhino a tough status card. If Rhino already
has a tough status card, this card gains surge.”)
Each Time — The phrase “each time” denotes a temporary
interruption to a resolving ability. When a condition is met
that is specified by the “each time” effect, the resolution
of the preceding ability halts, the “each time” effect
resolves in its entirety, then the preceding ability continues
resolving. (For example, “You Dare Oppose Me?“ reads:
“When Revealed: Discard the top 5 cards of the encounter
deck. Each time a card belonging to the Kree Fanatic set is
discarded this way, deal that card to yourself as a facedown
encounter card.”)

Amplify Icon

The amplify icon represents various forces that are empowering or bolstering the villain. When a boost card is turned faceup during an enemy activation, add one additional boost icon to that card for each amplify icon in play

And

The word “and” indicates that two or more effects within
an ability resolve simultaneously.
• Individual effects connected by “and” are not
dependent on each other. As long as at least one of
the effects can change the game state, resolve as
much of the ability as possible.
• Each effect connected by “and” can be canceled or
prevented independently

Aspect Card

Cards in the “aspect” classification are any cards that
belong to the Aggression, Justice, Leadership, and/or
Protection aspects.
• When building a player deck, a player must choose
one of the four aspects (Aggression, Justice,
Leadership, or Protection) to use for customization.
The remainder of their deck (the portion not
allocated to their identity-specific cards) can then
be customized with cards that belong to the chosen
aspect.
• A card’s aspect is designated by the aspect’s name
printed at the bottom of the card in its deckbuilding
classification area.

Attack (Enemy Activation)

An attack is a type of enemy activation. When an enemy
attacks, it targets a specific player, then resolves that attack
against that player. To resolve an enemy attack, follow these
steps:

  1. If a villain, or a minion with the villainous keyword, is
    attacking, give it one facedown boost card from the
    encounter deck. (If a minion without the villainous
    keyword is attacking, skip this step.)
  2. If a player wishes to defend, that player exhausts a hero
    or ally as the defender. If a player other than the target
    player defends, the defending player becomes the
    target player for this attack.
  3. Flip each of the attacking enemy’s boost cards faceup
    one at a time. (If a minion without the villainous
    keyword is attacking, skip this step.) Then, in order:
    • Resolve any “Boost” abilities, indicated by the star
    icon in the boost field.
    • Increase the attacking enemy’s ATK value by one for
    each boost icon on the card.
    • Discard each boost card after it is resolved.
  4. Deal damage from the attack equal to the attacking
    enemy’s modified ATK value, based on the following:
    • If a hero defends the attack, the amount of damage
    dealt is reduced by that hero’s DEF value, and the
    remaining damage from the attack is dealt to that
    hero.
    • If an ally defends the attack, all damage from the
    attack is dealt to the ally. (If the ally is defeated by the
    attack, additional damage does not carry over to the
    identity.)
    • If no character defends the attack, the attack is
    considered undefended. All damage from the attack
    is dealt to the target player’s identity (even if that
    identity is in alter-ego form).

Basic Card

Cards in the “Basic” classification are cards that are not
associated with a specific identity or aspect.
• When building a deck, a player may customize the
remainder of their deck (the portion not allocated to
their identity-specific cards) using basic cards.
• A card is designated as basic if it has the word
“Basic” printed at the bottom of the card in its
deckbuilding classification area.
• Basic cards are not aspect cards

Basic Power

A basic power is a statistic that allows a character to
perform a certain game function. There are five different
basic powers:
• Attack power (ATK) can be used by a character to
perform a basic attack and deal damage to another
character. Generally, heroes, allies, villains, and
minions have attack power.
• Thwart power (THW) can be used by a character
to perform a basic thwart and remove threat from
a scheme. Generally, heroes and allies have thwart
power.
• Defense power (DEF) can be used by a character to
perform a basic defense and prevent damage from an
attack. Generally, only heroes have defense power.
• Recovery power (REC) can be used by a character
to perform a basic recovery and heal damage from
themself. Generally, only alter-egos have recovery
power.
• Scheme power (SCH) can be used by a character to
perform a basic scheme and place threat on the main
scheme. Generally, villains and minions have scheme
power

Campaign-Specific Card

Cards in the “campaign-specific” classification are cards
that belong to a campaign’s set of accompanying cards.
• Campaign-specific cards can only be used during a
campaign from the same product (determined by that
product’s set icon).
• A campaign’s rules determine how players utilize
campaign-specific cards within that campaign.
• A campaign-specific card is designated by the word
“Campaign” printed at the bottom

Choose

The word “choose” indicates that a player must select a game element that meets the specific requirements of an ability.

If a player card ability requires the choosing of a
target, and there is no valid target, the ability cannot
be initiated.
• If multiple targets are required to be chosen by the
same player, simultaneously choose as many as are
available, to a maximum of the specified number.
• An effect that can choose “any number” of targets
does not successfully resolve (and cannot change the
game state) if zero of those targets are chosen.
• A card is not an eligible target for an ability if the
resolution of that ability’s effect could not change the
card’s state

Classifications

A card’s classification is the group that a card belongs to as
determined by its specific attributes.
• Cards in the “identity-specific” classification are cards
that belong to an identity’s set of accompanying
cards. (See: Identity-Specific Card)
• Cards in the “aspect” classification are cards that
belong to the Aggression, Justice, Leadership, and/or
Protection aspects. (See: Aspect Card)
• Cards in the “Basic” classification are not associated
with a specific identity or aspect. (See: Basic Card)
• Cards in the “scenario-specific” classification are
cards that belong to a scenario’s set of accompanying
cards. (See: Scenario-Specific Card)
• Cards in the “modular encounter set” or “modular
set” classification are cards that belong to a modular
set of encounter cards. (See: Modular Encounter Set)
• Cards in the “campaign-specific” classification are
cards that can only be used during a campaign from
the same product. (See: Campaign-Specific Card)
• Cards in the “Standard” classification are cards that
are added to most scenarios. (See: Modes of Play,
Standard Set)
• Cards in the “Expert” classification are cards that are
added to scenarios when playing expert mode. (See:
Expert Set, Modes of Play)

Confuse, Confused

Confuse is a status that prevents a character from adding or
removing threat with its next scheme or thwart, respectively.

• If an ability “confuses” a character, give that character
a confused status card.
• If a character has an ability stating that it “cannot be
confused,” confused status cards cannot be placed
on that character

Consequential Damage

• Consequential damage is dealt to an ally after
resolving abilities that are triggered by the ally
attacking or thwarting.

Copy

A copy of a card is defined by title. A second copy of a card
is any other card that shares the same title and subtitle (if
any), regardless of card’s type, text, artwork, or any other
differing characteristics between the cards

Cost

When generating resources to pay a cost, a player
is permitted to generate resources beyond the
specified cost. However, any resources that are
generated beyond the required cost are lost after
paying the cost

• Some card ability may reference an “additional cost.”
A player must pay all additional costs simultaneously
with the cost that is being added to, even if multiple
cards or abilities are adding separate additional
costs. A player cannot pay the original cost or any of
the additional costs individually; if they cannot pay
for all of the costs at once, then they do not pay any
of the costs and the effect associated with the costs
does not occur

Cost Arrow Icon

A cost arrow icon (→) in ability text distinguishes a cost from
an effect, in a “pay cost → resolve effect” format. Nonbolded text before the cost arrow icon must be paid and/or
resolved in full before the text after the cost arrow icon can
be resolved.

Dash (Value)

If a character’s power (ATK, DEF, REC, SCH, and THW) has
a dash (–) as the value, the character cannot exhaust to use
that power. If a game step or card ability references a power
with the value of dash (–), that value is treated as 0.

Deck

There are four main types of decks that appear in a game:
the player deck, the encounter deck, the villain deck, and
the main scheme deck. Certain identities or scenarios may
add other decks to the game.
• The order of cards within a deck cannot be altered
unless a player is instructed to do so by a game step,
game function, or card ability.

Defeat

If a character has zero or fewer remaining hit points, or if a
side scheme has no threat on it, it is defeated.
• If an ally, minion, or side scheme is defeated, it is
discarded.
If an identity or stage of the villain is defeated, it is
removed from the game.

Defend, Defense

During an enemy attack, a player may defend against that
attack using cards they control.
• Only one player at a time can defend against an
enemy attack. Once a player defends, no other player
can defend against that same attack.

• A hero can use their basic defense power to defend
against an enemy attack. A hero must exhaust to
use this power. The amount of damage dealt by the
attack is reduced by the hero’s DEF value, and any
remaining damage is dealt to that hero. Once a hero
defends against an attack, no other friendly character
can defend against that attack.

• An ally can exhaust to defend against an enemy
attack. Damage from the attack is dealt to that ally.
Once an ally defends against an attack, no other
friendly character can defend against that attack.

When a player resolves a triggered ability labeled as
a defense—such as “Hero Interrupt (defense)”—that
player’s identity becomes the defender and is
considered to have defended the attack (they do not
reduce the damage dealt by their DEF value). Unless
specified by the ability’s text, a hero does not exhaust
when using such an ability. The defending player
may resolve any number of defense abilities during
an enemy attack (as long as the triggering conditions
of those abilities are met). Once a player resolves
a defense ability during an enemy attack, no other
player can resolve defense abilities for that same
attack.
• If a player defends against an enemy attack that
targets a different player (either by defending with
a character they control or by resolving a defense
ability), the defending player becomes the new target
of that attack.
• If no character is used to defend against an enemy
attack, that attack is considered undefended.
Additionally, if a defending ally is defeated before
damage from the attack is dealt (such as through
a “Boost” ability), the attack is considered
undefended.

Discard

Discarding is the act of attempting to move a card from
a non-discard-pile play area to a discard pile.
• If a player card is discarded, it is placed faceup on top
of the owning player’s discard pile.
• If an encounter card is discarded, it is placed faceup
on top of the encounter discard pile.
• If multiple cards are discarded simultaneously from
a player’s hand or from play, place those cards in the
appropriate discard pile in any order.
• If multiple cards are discarded simultaneously from
a deck, place those cards in the appropriate discard
pile one at a time (without changing the order).
See also: Discard Pile, Encounter Card, In Play and Out of
Play, Ownership and Control, Player Card, Shuffle

Discard Pile

A discard pile is an out-of-play area that contains cards that
have been discarded throughout the game.
• Each player has their own discard pile, and the
encounter deck has its own discard pile.
• Each discard pile is open information, and may be
looked at by any player at any time.
• The order of cards in a discard pile may not be
changed unless a player is instructed to do so by a
card ability.
• Any ability that would shuffle a discard pile of zero
cards back into a deck does not shuffle the deck.

Encounter Card


There are seven encounter card types: attachment cards,
environment cards, minion cards, main scheme cards, side
scheme cards, treachery cards, and villain cards.
• Encounter cards belong to various classifications, such
as scenario-specific encounter cards or modular set
encounter cards.
• Most encounter cards have an orange card back.
See also: Attachment, Classifications, Environment, Main
Scheme, Minion, Side Scheme, Treachery, Villain, Appendix
I: Deck Construction


Encounter Deck


The encounter deck contains the encounter cards
(attachments, environments, minions, side schemes, and
treacheries) that players can face during a scenario.
• The order of cards within the encounter deck cannot
be changed unless a player is instructed to do so by a
game step, game function, or card ability.
If the encounter deck is empty, the encounter discard pile is
immediately shuffled to create a new encounter deck. When
this occurs, place an acceleration token next to the main
scheme deck.
• If a card ability discards a specified number of
cards from the encounter deck or until a card with
specific criteria is discarded, discard cards from the
encounter deck until the discard condition is met or
the encounter deck is empty. If the encounter deck is
emptied this way, that card ability is considered to be
fulfilled. Do not continue the discard effect with the
newly shuffled encounter deck.
• If there are no cards in both the encounter deck and
the encounter discard pile simultaneously (such as
all cards from the encounter deck being in play),
an infinite loop occurs with an infinite number of
acceleration tokens being placed next to the main
scheme deck. If this happens, the players lose.


Encounter Set

An encounter set is a grouping of encounter cards.

• There are four types of encounter sets: scenario specific encounter sets, modular encounter sets, the Standard set, and the Expert set.


Energy Resource

An energy resource () is one of the four types of resources.
• Energy resources can be spent to pay the resource
cost of cards and abilities.
• Some card abilities specifically require energy
resources to be spent in order to resolve their effects.


Engage

After a minion enters play in a player’s play area, it engages that player.

If a card ability instructs a player to engage a minion,
that minion is also considered to have engaged that
player.
• While a minion is engaged with a player, card abilities
cannot cause the minion to engage with the same
player again (as the two are already engaged).


Excess Damage

Excess damage is any amount of damage is that dealt to a
character beyond that character’s remaining hit points.


Expert Set

The expert set is an encounter set that is added scenarios
during expert mode.
• The expert set is not a modular encounter set and
cannot be selected (by the players or randomly) when
a scenario requires players to choose a modular
encounter set to include in that scenario.
• Cards in the “Expert” classification are any cards that
have the word “Expert” printed by the bottom of the
card in its encounter set name area.


First Player

If an encounter card requires a card ability to be
resolved, a game function to be performed, or a
choice to be made but does not specify which player
should act, the first player does so.


Guard

While a minion with the guard keyword is engaged with a
player, that player cannot use cards they control to attack a
villain without this keyword.


Hazard Icon

During step three of the villain phase, for each hazard
icon on cards in play, deal an additional encounter card.
Additional cards are dealt in player order (first additional
card to the first player, the second to the second player,
etc.)


Hinder X

When a card with the hinder X keyword is revealed, place
X threat on that card. (X is the value next to the hinder
keyword.)


Hit Points

When damage is dealt to a character, it reduces the
character’s remaining hit points (the amount of damage that
character can take before reaching zero hit points).
• An identity’s or villain’s hit point dial represents
their remaining hit points. If an identity or villain
is damaged, apply the damage by reducing that
character’s hit point dial by the specified amount.

• If a player’s hit point dial is reduced to zero, that
player is defeated and eliminated from the game.
• If a villain’s hit point dial is reduced to zero, that stage
of the villain is defeated.
• If an ally or minion is damaged, track the damage by
placing damage tokens on that character. Damage
tokens on an ally or minion reduce that character’s
remaining hit points by the total value of the tokens.
An ally or minion with zero or fewer remaining hit
points is defeated and placed in the appropriate
discard pile.
Some characters may have an infinite number of hit points.
A character with infinite hit points cannot be defeated by
taking damage, as the amount of damage that character
takes will never cause its remaining hit points to reach zero.
However, damage may still be dealt to a character with
infinite hit points through attacks and card abilities

Icons

Icons are game elements that represent various functions
within the game.
• Energy Icon (): An energy icon is a resource icon
that generates one energy resource when spent.
(See: Energy Resource)
• Mental Icon (): A mental icon is a resource icon that
generates one mental resource when spent. (See:
Mental Resource)
• Physical Icon (): A physical icon is a resource icon
that generates one physical resource when spent.
(See: Physical Resource)
• Wild Icon (): A wild icon is a resource icon that
can generate one energy, mental, physical, or wild
resource when spent. (See: Wild Resource)
• Acceleration Icon (): An acceleration icon places
additional threat on the main scheme during the
villain phase. (See: Acceleration Icon)
• Amplify Icon (): An amplify icon increases the
number of boost icons on boost cards during enemy
activations by one. (See: Amplify Icon)
• Crisis Icon (): A crisis icon prevents players from
removing threat from the main scheme. (See: Crisis
Icon)
• Hazard Icon (): A hazard icon increases the number
of encounter cards that are dealt to players during the
villain phase. (See: Hazard Icon)
• Boost Icon (): A boost icon increases the activating
enemy’s ATK or SCH value during enemy activations.
(See: Boost)
• Star Icon (): A star icon is used in conjunction with
a card’s stat or boost field to indicate that there is a
mandatory ability in the text box that corresponds to
that field. (See: Star Icon)
• Consequential Damage Icon (): A consequential
damage icon is used in conjunction with an ally’s
ATK field or THW field. After an ally attacks or
thwarts, it takes one consequential damage for
each consequential damage icon in that field. (See:
Consequential Damage)
• Per Player Icon (): A per player icon next to a value
multiplies that value by the number of players who
started the scenario. (See: Per Player Icon)
• Unique Icon (): A unique icon in a card’s title
indicates the card is unique. (See: Unique Icon)

Identity-Specific Card

Cards in the “identity-specific” classification (also
sometimes called “hero-specific”) are cards that belong to
an identity’s set of accompanying cards.
• A player’s deck must include each identity-specific
card associated with their chosen identity card. The
exact quantity of each card in that identity-specific set
must be included in the deck.
• Identity-specific cards (along with obligation cards
and nemesis encounter set cards) may only be used
alongside an identity if those cards share a set icon
with that identity.
• An identity-specific card is designated by the
identity’s name with which it is associated printed
at the bottom of the card in its deckbuilding
classification area.

In Play and Out of Play

A card is considered to either be in play or out of play
depending on its state within the game.
If a card is in play, its text is active and it can affect the
game.
• For player cards, the faceup side of a player’s identity
card is in play. The faceup ally cards, support cards,
and upgrade cards that have entered play (played,
put into play, etc.) are in play.
• For encounter cards, the faceup side of the top card
of the villain deck and the faceup side of the top
card of the main scheme deck are in play. The faceup
attachment cards, environment cards, minion cards,
obligation cards, and side scheme cards that have
entered play (revealed, put into play, etc.) are in play.
• A card enters play when it moves from an out-of-play
area to a play area.
• Card abilities only interact with, and can only
target, cards that are in play (unless the ability text
specifically refers to an out-of-play area).
• Card abilities on all card types, except event
cards and treachery cards, can only be initiated or
affect the game while they are in play unless they
specifically refer to being used from an out-of-play
area.
• If a card is double-sided (having game text on each
side of the card), the faceup side of the card is in play.
If a card is out of play, its text is inactive and cannot affect
the game.
• Event cards and treachery cards implicitly resolve
from an out-of-play area, by virtue of the rules
pertaining to those card types.
• Cards in a player’s hand, deck, and discard pile are
out of play.
• Cards in the encounter deck, encounter discard pile,
unrevealed cards in the villain deck, unrevealed cards
in the main scheme deck, and facedown encounter
cards dealt to a player are out of play.
• Any cards that have been removed from the game or
that have been set aside are out of play

Incite X

When a card with the incite X keyword is revealed, place X
threat on the main scheme. (X is the value next to the incite
keyword.)

Indirect Damage

If an enemy’s attack deals indirect damage, the
indirect damage is dealt during step four of the
enemy activation (after player’s have the opportunity
to defend against the attack).

Keywords

Guard: While a minion with guard is engaged with
a player, that player cannot attack the villain. (See:
Guard)
• Hinder X: When a player reveals a card with hinder X,
that player places X threat on that card. (See: Hinder
X)
• Incite X: When a player reveals a card with incite X,
that player places X threat on the main scheme. (See:
Incite X)
• Overkill: Excess damage from attacks with overkill
are dealt to the identity or villain. (See: Overkill)
• Patrol: While a minion with patrol is engaged with a
player, that player cannot thwart the main scheme.
(See: Patrol)
• Peril: While a player is resolving a card with peril,
other players cannot help that player. (See: Peril)
• Permanent: Cards with permanent cannot leave play.
(See: Permanent)
• Piercing: Attacks with piercing discard tough status
cards from the target before damage is dealt. (See:
Piercing)

• Quickstrike: After this enemy engages a player, it
immediately attacks that player if they are in hero
form. (See: Quickstrike)
Ranged: Attacks with ranged ignore retaliate. (See:
Ranged)

Restricted: A player cannot control more than two
restricted cards at a given time. (See: Restricted)
• Retaliate X: After a character with retaliate X is
attacked, deal X damage to the attacker. (See:
Retaliate X)
• Setup: Cards with setup start the game in play. (See:
Setup)
• Stalwart: Characters with Stalwart cannot be stunned
or confused. (See: Stalwart)
• Surge: After a player reveals a card with surge, that
player reveals an additional encounter card. (See:
Surge)
• Team-Up: Cards with team-up cannot be played
unless both characters listed by the keyword are in
play. (See: Team-Up)
• Toughness: When a character with toughness enters
play, place a tough status card on it. (See: Tough/
Toughness)
• Uses (X “type”): When a card with uses enters
play, place X all-purpose counters from the token
pool on that card. After the last all-purpose counter
is removed from a card with uses (and the effect
resolves), discard that card. (See: Uses (X “type”))
• Victory X: When a card with victory X is defeated,
add it to the victory display. (See: Victory X)
• Villainous: When a minion with villainous activates,
give it a boost card. (See: Villainous)

Leaves Play

The phrase “leaves play” refers to any time when a card
transitions from an in-play area to an out-of-play area.
Defeating a character, discarding a card from play, placing
a card in the victory display, or removing a card from the
game are all different means by which a card can leave play.
• When a card leaves play, there is no memory of its
previous state and it is considered to be a new copy
of the card.

Look, Looked-At

If an ability instructs a player to look at cards that are
otherwise hidden from the players, only the player who is
resolving the ability can look at those cards. However, that
player is permitted to convey any amount of information
related to those cards to other players

Mental Resource

A mental resource () is one of the four types of resources.
• Mental resources can be spent to pay the resource
cost of cards and abilities.
• Some card abilities specifically require mental
resources to be spent in order to resolve their effects

Minion

If a minion engages a player during an enemy
activation in which all minions engaged with that
player are instructed to activate (such as through a
“Boost” ability during step two of the villain phase),
the newly-engaged minion will also activate.

Modes of Play

Before starting a game of Marvel Champions, players can
customize their experience by choosing from or combining
different modes of play. The modes of play are:
Standard Mode — Standard Mode is the basic mode of
play for all scenarios.
To play in Standard Mode, follow the content and
setup instructions for the chosen scenario.

Expert Mode — Expert Mode is a modification of standard
mode
for advanced players who seek a greater challenge.
To play a standard game modified by expert mode,
follow the content and setup instructions for the
chosen scenario, using the listed expert mode
villain stages, and add the Expert encounter set to
encounter deck.
• Expert mode can also be combined with heroic
mode, skirmish mode, and/or campaign mode.

Heroic Mode — Heroic mode is a modification of standard
mode that allows players to scale the difficulty of the game.
• To play a standard game modified by heroic mode
,
before the game begins, the player group chooses a
heroic level number (such as heroic level 1 or 4). Then,
for the remainder of that game, during step three of
each villain phase, deal X additional encounter cards
to each player, where X is equal to the chosen heroic
level number.
Heroic mode can also be combined with expert
mode, skirmish mode, and/or campaign mode.

Skirmish Mode — Skirmish mode (also sometimes called
Rookie Mode) is a modification of standard mode that
allows players to shorten the length of the game.
• To play a standard game modified by skirmish mode,
before the game begins, the player group chooses
any one version of the villain. During step eight of
game setup (Select Villain), put only the chosen
version of the villain into play and remove each other
version in the villain deck from the game.
• Skirmish mode can also be combined with expert
mode, heroic mode, and/or campaign mode.
Campaign Mode — Campaign mode allows players to
modify standard mode through interconnected scenarios
that are played one after another. No two campaigns
are exactly alike, and the rules for each are found in the
campaign’s associated rulebook.
• Expert campaign mode is a modification of campaign
mode for advanced players who seek a greater
challenge. The rules for each expert campaign mode
are found in the campaign’s associated rulebook.
• Each campaign comes with its own campaign log.
The campaign log is a record of what effects or cards
persist between games in a campaign.
• If a card is removed from a campaign, that card can
no longer be used during the rest of the campaign,
even if players retry the scenario wherein that card
was removed.
• During campaign mode or expert campaign mode,
players can choose which other mode(s) they wish to
play for each individual scenario. The difficulty of the
campaign mode does not require players to play any
other specific game mode.
• Campaign mode (and expert campaign mode) can
also be combined with expert mode, heroic mode,
and/or skirmish mode.

Modular Encounter Set

Cards belonging to a “modular encounter set” (or
sometimes “modular set”) are a classification of encounter
card that can be added to and/or removed from nearly
any scenario.
• During game setup, many scenarios will instruct the
players on how many modular encounter sets must be
included in that scenario. Depending on the scenario,
some modular encounter sets are required, while
others can be chosen by the players.
• If a modular encounter set is added to a scenario, it
is done so as an entire set. Unless specific scenario
rules state otherwise, individual cards from a modular
encounter set cannot be included in a scenario
without the rest of that set.
• A modular encounter set card is designated by
the modular encounter set’s name with which it is
associated printed at the bottom of the card in its
encounter set name area.

Nemesis Encounter Set

A nemesis encounter set is a subset of an identityspecific set.
• A nemesis set cards may only be used alongside
an identity if those cards share a set icon with that
identity

Non-Numerical Variable

If a non-numerical variable (such as a letter or other symbol)
is used in place of a numerical value, treat that variable
as being equal to 0 for the purpose of game steps, game
functions, and card abilities.
If a non-numerical variable is defined to have a numerical
value (such as a card ability assigning a value to ‘X’), treat
that variable as the defined value.
• For costs involving the letter X, the value of X is
defined by card ability or player choice, after which
the amount paid may be modified by effects without
changing the value of X

Obligation

Identity-specific obligation cards are part of their
associated identity’s identity-specific set.
• Identity-specific obligation cards can only be used
alongside an identity if those cards share a set icon
with that identity.

If an obligation card is revealed from the encounter deck
and that obligation instructs that it must be given to a
specific player (such as “Give to the Peter Parker player”),
place that obligation into the player’s play area who controls
the associated identity. That player must decide how to
resolve the obligation.

• If the identity associated with a revealed obligation
card has been eliminated, ignore the card’s ability,
remove it from the game, and reveal an additional
encounter card.
If a player reveals an obligation card from the encounter
deck and that obligation does not instruct that it must be
given to a specific player, the player places that obligation
into their play area. That player must decide how to resolve
the obligation.
• Only the player with the obligation in their play-area
can trigger abilities or pay costs on that obligation.

Overkill

If an ally is dealt any amount of excess damage by an attack
with the overkill keyword, simultaneously deal damage
equal to the excess amount to the identity of the player who
controls the ally.
If a minion is dealt any amount of excess damage by an
attack with the overkill keyword, simultaneously deal
damage equal to the excess amount to the villain.
• Damage dealt by overkill to an identity or villain does
not constitute an attack against that character.
• If a card ability counts excess damage dealt, that
ability counts the same value of excess damage that
is calculated when resolving the overkill keyword.

Ownership and Control

If a game step or card ability references a card that
“you control” or a “player controls,” that game step
or card ability only refers to cards in play currently
under that player’s control.

Peril

While a player is resolving a card with the peril keyword,
that player cannot consult other players, and other players
cannot play cards or trigger abilities

Permanent

A card with the permanent keyword cannot leave play.
• If a player is eliminated from the game while a
permanent card they do not own is in their play area,
place that permanent card in its owner’s discard pile

Piercing

An attack with the piercing keyword discards any tough
status cards from the target of the attack before dealing
damage.

Physical Resource

A physical resource () is one of the four types of resources.
• Physical resources can be spent to pay the resource
cost of cards and abilities.
• Some card abilities specifically require physical
resources to be spent in order to resolve their effects.

Play Area

There are two types of play areas: a player’s play area and
the villain’s play area.
• A player’s play area contains that player’s identity,
deck, hand, discard pile, any cards in play under
their control, and any faceup or facedown encounter
cards in their play area (such as engaged minions or
encounter cards that have been dealt to them).
• The villain’s play area contains the villain deck, main
scheme deck, encounter deck, encounter discard
pile, and any encounter cards in play that have not
entered a player’s play area (such as side schemes or
environments).
• A card cannot be in more than one play area at a
time.

Player

A player is a person who is playing in a game of Marvel
Champions.
• Each player in the game has their own personal play
area containing their identity card, their identity’s hit
point dial, their hand of cards, their deck that they draw
from, their discard pile that they place their discarded
cards into, any allies, upgrades, or supports that they
may have in play, and any attachments, minions, or
obligations that they may have in their play area.
• During each player phase of each round, each player
takes their own personal turn where they can play
cards, perform actions with cards they control, and
use various abilities.
• Each player owns the cards that were contained
within their deck (including their identity card) at the
start of the game.
• Some game steps, game functions, or card abilities
may refer to the “first player”. The first player is the
player who has the first player token.

Player Card

There are six player card types: ally cards, event cards,
identity cards, resource cards, support cards, and upgrade
cards.
• Player cards may belong to various classifications, such
as identity-specific player cards or aspect player cards.
• Most player cards have a blue card back.

Player Deck

A player’s deck contains the player cards (allies, events,
resources, supports, and upgrades) owned by the player
who started the game with that deck.
• The order of cards within a player’s deck cannot be
changed unless a player is instructed to do so by a
game step, game function, or card ability.
If a player deck empties, the player shuffles their discard
pile to make a new deck. That player immediately deals
themself one facedown encounter card from the top of the
encounter deck.
• If the player’s deck empties and reshuffles while the
player was drawing cards, the player continues to draw
cards up to the specified number.
• If the player’s deck empties while the player was
discarding cards from their deck, no further cards are
discarded from the newly shuffled deck.

Player Elimination

When a player is eliminated, perform the following in order:

  1. If there are minions engaged with the eliminated player,
    each of those minions engages
    the next clockwise
    player, retaining any attachments, damage, counters,
    and status cards on them.
  2. If there are cards in the eliminated player’s play area
    that are not owned by that player, place each of those
    cards in its owner’s discard pile (even if that card has the
    permanent keyword).
  3. Remove the eliminated player’s play area and each other
    game element within (hand, deck, discard pile, cards in
    play, hit point dial, etc.) from the game.

Player’s Play Area

A player’s play area (also sometimes referred to as a
“player’s game area”) is the area of play where a player’s
identity card, deck, hand, discard pile, and hit point dial are
located. Each player in the game has their own play area.
• Ally cards, support cards, and upgrade cards are
placed in a player’s play area when they enter play.
• Attachment cards attached to cards in the villain’s
play area are not in the player’s play area.
• Minion cards engaged with a player are in that
player’s play area and not in the villain’s play area.
• Obligation cards given to a play are in that player’s
play area and not in the villain’s play area.
• While card abilities can affect cards across play areas,
unless a game rule or card ability states otherwise,
cards cannot be played into another player’s play
area.
• If a player is eliminated from the game (through their
identity being defeated, or otherwise), their play area
is removed from the game.

Quickstrike

After a minion with the quickstrike keyword engages a
player whose identity is in hero form, that minion attacks
that player

Ranged

An attack with the ranged keyword ignores the retaliate
keyword

Referential Ability

Some abilities refer to specific cards by name. These are
called referential abilities.
• If an ability references the name of the card that
the ability is on, that ability is self-referential. A
self-referential ability refers only to the card on which
it is located and not to other copies of that card or
different cards with the same title.
• If an ability on an identity-specific card references
the name of the identity to which it belongs, it is
referencing only that identity and not other cards that
may share a name with that identity.
• If a non-self-referential, non-identity-specific card
references a card and there are multiple cards in
play with that name, the player resolving that ability
may choose which card with that name becomes the
target of that ability.

Remaining Hit Points

A character’s remaining hit points is the amount of damage
that character can take before reaching zero hit points.
• An identity’s or villain’s hit point dial represents their
remaining hit points.
• To calculate remaining hit points for an ally or minion,
start with the character’s maximum hit points (as
indicated by its printed value modified by any card
abilities or game effects), and subtract their sustained
damage (the number of damage counters on them).

Reminder Text

Some card abilities may include reminder text. Reminder
text is italicized and in parentheses (like this). Reminder text
has no effect on the game and is only intended to remind a
player of a specific game function or rule.

Resource

There are four types of resources in the game:
energy, mental, and physical, and wild. Wild resources
can be used as their type or any of the other types

Resource Cards

Resource cards are considered to be an extension of an
identity. If a player spends a resource, that resource is
also considered to be spent by that player’s identity
.

Restricted

A player cannot have more than two cards with the
restricted keyword in play under their control at the same
time. If a player ever controls more than two restricted cards
in play, they must immediately choose and discard from play
restricted cards they control until they have only two in play.

Retaliate X

After a character with the retaliate X keyword is attacked,
deal X damage to the attacker. (X is the value next to the
retaliate keyword.)
• The character with retaliate X must survive the attack
to deal this damage.

Scenario-Specific Card

Cards in the “scenario-specific” classification are cards that
belong to a scenario’s set of accompanying cards.
• A scenario must include each scenario-specific card
associated with that scenario. The exact quantity of
each card in that set is determined by the scenario.
• In most scenarios, the scenario-specific cards
are separated into three decks: the villain deck
(comprised of that scenario’s villain cards), the main
scheme deck (comprised of that scenario’s main
scheme cards), and the encounter deck (comprised of
that scenario’s attachment, environment, minion, side
scheme, and treachery cards).
• A scenario-specific card is designated by the name of
the scenario with which it is associated printed at the
bottom of the card in its encounter set name area

Scheme (Card Type)

The word “scheme” denotes two different card types: main
schemes and side schemes.
• If a card ability places threat on or removes threat
from “a scheme,” the player resolving that ability
chooses which scheme—main scheme or side
schemes—that ability affects

Scheme (Enemy Activation)

A scheme is a type of enemy activation. If an enemy is
instructed to scheme, follow these steps:

  1. If a villain, or a minion with the villainous keyword, is
    scheming, give it one facedown boost card from the
    encounter deck. (If a minion without the villainous
    keyword is scheming, skip this step.)
  2. Flip each of the scheming enemy’s boost cards faceup
    one at a time. (If a minion without the villainous
    keyword is scheming, skip this step.) Then, in order:
    • Resolve any “Boost” abilities, indicated by the star
    icon in the boost field.
    • Increase the scheming enemy’s SCH value by one for
    each boost icon on the card.
    • Discard each boost card after it is resolved.
  3. Place threat on the main scheme equal to the scheming
    enemy’s modified SCH value

Search

If any portion of a deck is searched, upon completion of that game step, game function, or card ability, shuffle that entire deck.

Set Aside

Some game steps or card abilities instruct players to
set aside specific cards. Set-aside cards are out of play
and have no interaction with the game until they are
referenced by instructions within the scenario or by a card
ability.

Set Aside

Shuffling is the game function of randomizing the contents
of a deck.
• If a player is instructed to shuffle a deck, that deck
must be randomized to the point where no player
within the game can ascertain the order of the cards
within that deck.
• Any time a deck is searched by a game step or card
ability, that deck is shuffled after the game step or
card ability completes its resolution.

Side Scheme

If a side scheme is revealed, it enters play and is placed next
to the main scheme deck in the villain’s play area.

Stalwart

A character that has the stalwart keyword cannot be
stunned or confused.
• If a character gains the stalwart keyword while they
have a stunned and/or confused status card, each
stunned and/or confused status card is removed from
that character.

Standard Set

The standard set is an encounter set that is added to most
scenarios.
• The standard set is not a modular encounter set
and cannot be selected (by the players or randomly)
when a scenario requires players to choose a modular
encounter set to include in that scenario.
• Cards in the “Standard” classification are any cards
that have the word “Standard” printed by the bottom
of the card in its encounter set name area

Status Cards

Confused — A confused status card prevents a character
from thwarting or scheming.
• If a confused hero or ally attempts to thwart or use
a thwart ability, discard the confused card instead.
Costs associated with the thwart attempt, including
exhausting the character, must still be paid.
• If a confused villain or minion would scheme, discard
the confused status card instead.
• As the thwart action or scheme activation was
replaced by the removal of the confused status card,
that character is not considered to have thwarted or
schemed.
Stunned — A stunned status card prevents a character
from attacking.
• If a stunned hero or ally attempts to attack or use
an attack ability, discard the stunned card instead.
Costs associated with the attack attempt, including
exhausting the character, must still be paid.
• If a stunned villain or minion would attack, discard the
stunned status card instead.
• As the attack action or attack activation was replaced
by the removal of the stunned status card, that
character is not considered to have attacked.
Tough — A tough status card prevents a character from
taking damage.
• If a character with a tough status card would take any
amount of damage, prevent all of that damage and
discard the tough status card instead.
• As a tough status card prevents damage fully, the
character who had the tough status card is not
considered to have taken damage.

Support

Attacks, thwarts, defenses, action abilities, and
triggered abilities that resolve from supports in play
under a player’s control are not considered to be
performed by that player’s identity.

Surge

After an encounter card with this keyword is revealed, the
player resolving the card reveals an additional encounter
card from the top of the encounter deck.

Target

If a game function or card ability is directed toward a game
element (such as an attack that deals damage to an enemy),
that game element becomes the target of that function
or ability for the duration of that function’s or ability’s
resolution.
• The term “choose” indicates that one or more targets
must be selected in order for an ability to resolve.

Team-Up

The team-up keyword names two characters. In order for a
player to include a card with the team-up keyword in their
deck, that player’s chosen identity must match one of the
named characters. Additionally, a card with the team-up
keyword cannot be played unless both of the named
characters (hero or ally) are in play.

Text Box

The text box of a card is the area of a card that contains the
card’s printed abilities, traits, and flavor text (if any).
• If a card ability references a card’s “text box,” that
ability only references the printed abilities within that
card’s text box.

Tough

Tough is a status that prevents a character from taking
damage.

Toughness

When a character with the toughness keyword enters play,
place a tough status card on it.

Unique Icon

Additionally, some unique minions may have the same title
as other friendly or enemy characters.
• If a unique minion is revealed from the encounter
deck and attempts to enter play while another unique
character with the same title is already in play, the
player who is revealing that minion discards it, then
reveals a new card from the encounter deck.
• If a card ability attempts to put a unique minion into
play while another unique character with the same
title is already in play, that minion cannot enter play
and the “put into play” effect fails to resolve. Resolve
the remainder of the card ability as normal.

Upgrade

Unless attached to a different character, upgrade
cards are considered to be an extension of the
controlling player’s identity. Attacks, thwarts,
defenses, action abilities, and triggered abilities that
resolve on upgrades in play under a player’s control
are also considered to be resolved by that player’s
identity.

Uses (X type)

When a card with this keyword enters play, place X allpurpose counters from the token pool on the card. The
word following the value establishes and identifies the type
of uses the card holds.
Each card with this keyword also has an ability that
references the type of use established by the keyword as
part of the cost.
After the last all-purpose counter is removed from a card
with uses (and the effect resolves), discard that card.

Victory Display

The victory display is an out-of-play game area shared by
all players. Cards in the victory display follow the standard
rules for out-of-play cards

Victory X

When a card with the victory X keyword is defeated, place
it in the victory display instead of its owner’s discard pile.
While in the victory display, X indicates how many victory
points that card is worth. (X is the value next to the victory
keyword.)
• Some scenarios or campaigns may count the number
of victory points in the victory display.

Villain’s Play Area

The villain’s play area (also sometimes referred to as the
“villain’s game area”) is the area of play where the villain
deck, the main scheme deck, the encounter deck, the
encounter discard pile, and the villain’s hit point dial are
located.
• Environment cards and side scheme cards are placed
in the villain’s play area when they enter play.
• Attachments cards attached to cards in the villain’s
play area are in the villain’s play area. Attachment
cards attached to cards in a player’s play area are not
in the villain’s play area.
• Minion cards engaged with a player are in that
player’s play area and not in the villain’s play area.
• Obligation cards given to a player are in that player’s
play area and not in the villain’s play area.

Villanous

When a minion with the villainous keyword activates, give it
a facedown boost card from the top of the encounter deck.
When you resolve that minion’s activation, turn the boost
card faceup, resolve any boost ability on that card, and
apply its boost icons to the minion’s stats for this activation.
Discard the boost card after the activation.

When Completed Abilities

A when completed ability is a type of triggered ability,
indicated by the bold “When Completed” timing trigger.
When a main scheme is complete, all “When Completed”
abilities on the card resolve.

Wild Resource

A wild resource () is one of the four types of resources.
• Wild resources can be spent to pay the resource cost
of cards and abilities. When a player generates a wild
resource (), they may specify which resource type
(energy, mental, physical, or wild) it is being used as.
• Some card abilities specifically require wild resources
to be spent in order to resolve their effects.

Would

The word “would” is used to define the triggering condition
of some interrupt abilities, and establishes a higher timing
priority for those abilities than interrupts to the same
triggering condition without the word “would.”
• If an interrupt to a triggering condition that would
occur changes the nature of that which is about to
occur (such as through a replacement effect), no
further interrupts to the original trigger may be used
since the resolution of that trigger is no longer valid.
For example, an interrupt that states “when a character
would be defeated” triggers before an interrupt that states
“when a character is defeated.”

You

While resolving card abilities, if the word “you” can be
resolved as referring to the player’s identity, it must be
resolved as such. This includes but is not limited to:
• If a card deals damage to “you,” or “you” take damage,
the player resolving that damage applies it to the hit
point dial of their identity.
• If a card ability deals indirect damage to “you,” or
“you” take indirect damage, the player resolving that
damage can assign that damage to characters in play
under their control.
• If a card ability exhausts “you,” the player resolving that
card ability exhausts their identity.
• If a card ability places a status card on “you” (such
as “you are stunned”), the player resolving that card
ability places that status card on their identity.
• If a card ability triggers from a game function that
“you” perform (such as “after you attack and defeat
an enemy”), the player resolving that card ability must
resolve that card ability as if the identity they control
performed that game function, if able. (For example,
if an ability triggers “after you attack and defeat a
minion,” it triggers after the controlling player’s identity
attacks and defeats a minion but not when an ally under
that player’s control attacks and defeats a minion.)
While resolving card abilities, if the word “you” cannot
be resolved as referring to the player’s identity, it must be
resolved as referring to the player. This includes but is not
limited to:
• If a game step or card ability discards cards from
“your” hand, the player resolving that game step or
card ability discards the cards from their hand.
• If a card ability searches “your” deck, the player
resolving that ability searches for cards in their deck.
• If a game step or card ability performs a game function
against a non-identity card “you” control (such as
exhausting, discarding, setting aside, etc.), the player
resolving that game step or card ability performs that
game function against the card in their play area.
• If a card ability triggers from a game function that
“you” perform and cannot be interpreted in such a way
that would refer to the resolving player’s identity (such
as “after you discard cards from your hand”), the player
resolving that card ability must personally resolve and
perform the game function(s) of that ability.
Some player cards are considered to be an extension of a
player’s identity. When an action and/or ability is resolved
by a card type that is an extension of an identity, that
action and/or ability is considered to be performed by
that identity.
Cards that are considered to be an extension of a player’s
identity are:
• Events — Attacks, thwarts, defenses, action abilities,
and triggered abilities that resolve from a player
playing an event are also considered to be performed
by that player’s identity.
• Resources — If a player spends a resource, that
resource is also considered to be spent by that player’s
identity.
• Upgrades — Unless attached to a different character,
upgrade cards are considered to be an extension
of the controlling player’s identity. Attacks, thwarts,
defenses, action abilities, and triggered abilities that
resolve on upgrades in play under a player’s control
are also considered to be resolved by that player’s
identity.
Cards that are not considered to be an extension of a
player’s identity are:
• Allies — Attacks, thwarts, defenses, action abilities,
and triggered abilities that resolve from allies in play
under a player’s control are not considered to be
performed by that player’s identity.
• Supports — Attacks, thwarts, defenses, action
abilities, and triggered abilities that resolve from
supports in play under a player’s control are not
considered to be performed by that player’s identity

Appendix II: Setup

Step 10 – Create the Encounter Deck. Combine the encounter
sets listed on side 1A of the main scheme card.


Changed from 1.4 -> 1.4.2 (May 18, 2021)

p. 7, Attack (Enemy Activation) — “If a hero defends…” —> “If a hero makes a basic defense…”p. 7, Attack (Enemy Activation) — “If an ally defends the attack…” —> “If an ally defends against the attack…”p. 7, Attack (Enemy Activation) — “If no character defends the attack…” —> “If no character defends against the attack…”
p. 9, Card Types — Obligation added to “Attachment, environment, main scheme, minion, obligation, side scheme, treachery, and villain cards are types of encounter cards.”
p. 12, Encounter Card — “There are seven encounter card types: attachment cards, environment cards, minion cards, main scheme cards, side scheme cards, treachery cards, and villain cards.” —>”There are eight encounter card types: attachment cards, environment cards, minion cards, main scheme cards, obligation cards, side scheme cards, treachery cards, and villain cards.”
p. 13, Excess Damage — “Excess damage is any amount of damage is that dealt to…” —> “Excess damage is any amount of damage that is dealt to…”
p. 14, Expert Set —> “The expert set is an encounter set that is added scenarios” —> “The expert set is an encounter set that is added to scenarios”
p. 17, Indirect Damage —> Whole section reworked
p. 19, Main Scheme —> Added “• Main scheme cards cannot be discarded from play.”
p. 32, Villain Deck —> Added “• Villain cards cannot be discarded from play.”
p. 45 —> Added section on “Galaxy’s Most Wanted Expansion”